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Exodus 15, Exodus 16

Sunrise on the Red Sea. Moses climbed the nearest ridge for a wide-angle vision just to take it all in. With the sun warm on his back, he studied the sea for traces of the miracle they walked through. Gentle waves crested and broke in undulating rhythm as usual. Broken chariot wheels and lifeless Egyptians littered the shore. The tide was commencing to wash away millions of sandy footprints, evidence that God’s people had indeed walked through the sea. Daybreak and dry ground. Moses saw it with his eyes but he felt it with his soul.

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Exodus 13, Exodus 14

The moon was still making its way across the night sky when Moses came back with the news. At last, it was time to go. We don’t know how long it took for the word to reach every hut and hovel, but the people were ready and wasted no time. Families lined up by tribe, and tribes fell into step behind their leaders. Can you picture it? Hebrew migrants pouring out of Goshen in the middle of the night, leaving a ghost town where they had lived, labored and died as slaves for centuries. But now God’s people were leaving the land of their affliction behind.

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Exodus 11, Exodus 12

On day four, the light emerges but not in Pharaoh’s heart. He summons Moses to announce that he has decided to grant their request. In a grand gesture he adds that even your children can go. But Moses refuses to negotiate God’s terms. After months of devastation and suffering that brings Egypt to the brink of collapse, Pharaoh squanders it all—and for what? Before the night is over he will lose his own son.

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Mark 9

1 And he said to them, “Truly, I say to you, there are some standing here who will not taste death until they see the kingdom of God after it has come with power.” 2 And after six days Jesus took with him Peter and James and John, and led them up a high mountain by themselves. And he was transfigured before them, 3 and his clothes became radiant, intensely white, as no one on earth could bleach them. 4 And there appeared to them Elijah with Moses, and they were talking with Jesus. 5 And Peter said to Jesus, “Rabbi, it is good that we are here. Let us make three tents, one for you and one for Moses and one for Elijah.” 6 For he did not know what to say, for they were terrified. 7 And a cloud overshadowed them, and a voice came out of the cloud, “This is my beloved Son; listen to him.”

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Exodus 7, Exodus 8, Exodus 9, Exodus 10,

Egypt experienced one calamity after another. The people, the land, even the animals suffered because of Pharaoh. Every time he refused to let God’s people go, Pharaoh invited disaster on his own people.

 

The plagues were more than a random series of catastrophes to force Pharaoh to release the Hebrew slaves. With these judgments, God demonstrates His power over creation and exposes Egypt’s powerless gods. The plagues occurred over a period of about nine months.

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Exodus 5, Exodus 6

Exodus began with a pharaoh who feared a growing Hebrew population, so he decreed death for all baby boys. But times have changed. The pharaoh that Moses is dealing with isn’t about to let go of his Hebrew slaves. Who does Moses think he is, coming to Pharaoh with such a demand?

Exodus 3, Exodus 4

Moses cupped a hand over his eyes and squinted toward the mountain. From a distance at dawn, it looked like a camel’s hump jutting up from the desert floor, but now the sun was playing tricks with shadows. Shielding his eyes, Moses stared up into the craggy face of Mt. Horeb staring back down on him. He loved the solitude of this place. Mountains don’t care about time. Minutes and days and decades mean nothing to them. Mountains teach you to forget. And Moses had learned that lesson well.

Exodus 1, Exodus 2

Moses: Lawgiver . . . Lawbreaker . . . Liberator.
God called and Moses said, “Here I am.” Then he heard the plan and said, “Send someone else.” That’s not the kind of response we expect from an epic leader like Moses, but have we ever used a similar excuse? I can’t. I’m not qualified. It’s too soon . . . it’s too late.

We know Moses, the great hero of history, but who was the man behind the legend? He was born in poverty, raised in a palace, but the wilderness became his home. He was an outlaw, a loner, and a Lawgiver. Reluctant to lead but determined to follow God. At times he could be impulsive, impatient, explosive. He was idolized and criticized yet remained humble and forgiving. How did this man with so many complexities become a world-changer? Is the secret to his friendship with God something we can tap into? With Moses’ life and times as our script, we will explore why God chooses unlikely heroes—flaws, failures, and all—to accomplish His perfect plan.

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Romans Chapter 16

Congratulations! Upon completion of this last session through Paul’s letter to the Romans, you will receive your GOSPEL HANDS AND FEET CERTIFICATE authorizing you to go into all your world and preach the Good News to everyone. Actually, the Lord has already commissioned every believer to do that in Mark 16:15 (see fine print provisions in Acts 1:8, John 17:17–18, Matthew 5:16)

Romans Chapter 15

In a way, this chapter is what Paul has been leading up to since his opening comments in chapter 1. Remember what Paul told them? Your faith is being talked about all over the world. Can that be said of us? With all that Paul has written, we know they faced challenges, needed instruction, and still had some growing to do. Can that be said of us? But their obedience to God was well known (Romans 16:19). Can that be said of us?

Romans Chapter 14

Few Bible commands are more difficult or more essential to follow through on than Christ’s command to love one another. It’s not always easy, is it? Sometimes arguing feels so much more satisfying. In this chapter, Paul talks about Christians living in unity without demanding uniformity. When it comes to matters of opinion that the Bible is silent on, we are given the freedom to choose—but not without considering others or compromising our Christian witness.

Romans Chapter 13

Nothing proves our Christian witness like the wear and tear of daily life. In chapter 12, Paul taught how we should treat one another in light of God’s mercy to us. Love is the motive, and the specific instructions Paul gives encourage us to examine how we come across as individuals. Do we respond in ways that reveal the transforming power of God’s love in our life?

Romans Chapter 12

Chapter 12 is a turning point in this letter—and Paul clearly wanted it to be a turning point in the life of every believer who reads it. Every topic he has touched on in Romans brings us to this place. It is safe to say that Paul was passionate about two things: Preaching the gospel to those who are lost; and teaching believers to live out the gospel in everyday life.

Romans Chapter 11

If you’ve seen Fiddler on the Roof, you remember Tevye saying to God, “I know we’re the chosen people—but once in a while can’t You choose someone else?” Some people do think that God rejected the Jews, took back all of the promises He made, and gave them to the church instead. But Paul (who never saw Fiddler on the Roof) takes care of that question in this chapter.

Romans Chapter 10

Can you remember when those simple words first penetrated your heart? It probably wasn’t the first time you heard them. Children are taught to recite this verse. If you’re older than fifty, you’ve probably seen the words plastered on a roadside sign left to fade in the sun. John 3:16 is a favorite verse—but what do people actually hear? Skeptics hear a slogan. Disinterested masses hear a one-size-fits-all phrase. Pretenders hear the words they intend to fall back on someday. What do you hear?

Romans Chapter 9

Chapter 8 finished on such a high note. If God is for us, who can be against us? What can separate us from the love of God? Every obstacle Paul could imagine—and he had experienced them all— evaporated in the light of God’s unwavering love. He will never let go of you!

Romans Chapter 8:18–39

Paul wrote this letter to hundreds of Roman Christians he didn’t know. In his mind’s eye, he wrote to his old friends Aquila and Priscilla and a roomful of faces he’d never met, in a house he’d never been to, in a city he’d never visited. But he loved them like family—pouring himself, body and soul, into the pages for their spiritual wellbeing. How could he know that countless multitudes, centuries later would still be poring over this letter, gleaning truth, puzzling and praying their way through his tightly reasoned rhetoric?

1 John 4:7-12

“Whoever abides in love abides in God, and God abides in him.” The word abide means to stay, continue, dwell, remain, or be present. It is like living in a house. What types of things entice us to leave the house of God’s love?

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Romans Chapter 8:1–17

We are halfway through our study! This week we step into a favorite chapter, not only in Romans but in the Bible. For some of us, it will be a first-time read and more familiar for others. Either way, get ready for what’s new. Not in the sacred page, but how it will speak to you amidst all the stuff and substance of your life and whatever is trending in your heart.

Romans Chapter 7

How do we wrap our minds around grace? If facts were enough, Romans 6 and 7 would only need to be two short sentences: Sin can’t control you. The Law won’t save you. But Paul isn’t dispensing facts—he is relating to real life. And living by grace is more caught than taught.

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Romans Chapter 6

Complete freedom to act as one wishes or thinks best; writing one’s own terms for an agreement. Synonyms: free rein; a free hand; a blank check

To hear some people tell it, this is the definition of grace. Since God’s grace is inexhaustible, why worry about living a holy life? Paul knew that some would misinterpret his statement that, “Where sin increased, grace abounded all the more” (Romans 5:20 ESV).

Verse 2 says that faith in Christ grants us access into “this grace in which we stand.” Grace is “favor or kindness shown without regard to the worth or merit of the one who receives it and in spite of what that person deserves.

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Romans Chapter 5

Verse 2 says that faith in Christ grants us access into “this grace in which we stand.” Grace is “favor or kindness shown without regard to the worth or merit of the one who receives it and in spite of what that person deserves.

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Romans Chapter 5

The major point of the last few chapters has been that we have been imputed with righteousness, and therefore have been justified in the sight of God, through faith in Jesus Christ. What is a natural result of our justification?

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Romans Chapter 5

Paul wrote this letter to hundreds of Roman Christians he didn’t know. In his mind’s eye, he wrote to his old friends Aquila and Priscilla and a roomful of faces he’d never met, in a house he’d never been to, in a city he’d never visited. But he loved them like family—pouring himself, body and soul, into the pages for their spiritual wellbeing. How could he know that countless multitudes, centuries later would still be poring over this letter, gleaning truth, puzzling and praying their way through his tightly reasoned rhetoric?

Romans Chapter 4

Sometimes the truth is hiding in plain sight. We miss it because we think it has to be more complicated. Sometimes the truth gets buried in tradition; opinions passed down for so long they’re accepted without question and defended to death. No one knew this better than Paul, a former Pharisee.

Romans Chapter 3

Paul had always been one to speak his mind. He was trained to think a matter through and explain it decisively. His brilliance as a teacher/lawyer (that’s what a rabbi was) set him apart as a young man. Paul arrogantly pursued all the ceremony and demands of the Law, fully convinced that he was earning God’s approval. Then one day, on the Damascus Road, God knocked him down and turned his whole life right side up. The zeal remained, but the rage was gone.

Romans Chapter 2

If we could go back in time and visit the church in Rome, who would we be sitting with? There would be families and young adults, widows, and aging parents. Some worked a trade (Aquila and Priscilla were tentmakers) or in the marketplace but most would have been house slaves and manual laborers. Many were devout Jews and probably more were converted Gentiles.

Romans Chapter 1:18–32

Our first session finished on a high note, with Paul saying that the gospel is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes. The good news is that anyone can be saved by putting their faith in Jesus. It really is amazing when you consider that God has given us this life-changing, eternity-altering relationship with Him when, in fact, the only thing we deserve is punishment for our sin. But to fully appreciate and share the good news, we need to acknowledge the bad news.

Romans 1:1-17

Romans may be the most important letter you will ever read. In it you will discover who you are and where you stand with God. There will be consistent opportunities to consider what God has done for you and what God expects from you. Paul takes time to explain the basis of the Christian faith without avoiding tough issues or soft-selling the gospel. Instead, Paul skillfully navigates the deep waters of doctrine so that his readers will be anchored in faith.

Paul’s letter to the church in Rome is such a thorough explanation of the gospel that it has been called a “Bible within the Bible.” Who needs the gospel? Why is the gospel powerful? What does the gospel look like in the everyday life of a believer? With passion and precision, Paul walks us through the essentials of the gospel and how it changes everything.

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